Hip Hip Hooray!

 

Crowds at the Palace waiting for Royal Baby news

Crowds at the Palace waiting for Royal Baby news

Unless you live  under a rock or you’ve been on a self-inflicted media blackout, you know a historic moment occurred yesterday afternoon at 4:24 pm.  The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge welcomed a little boy into the world, an 8 lb 6 oz baby boy, yet to be named.  

Media tents outside the Palace

Media tents outside the Palace

The media set up camp outside St. Mary’s hospital in record -breaking heat for over three weeks in anticipation of the event.  The twitter-sphere followed #royalbaby  since The Palace announced the Duchess’s  pregnancy months ago.   Granted, the media coverage was over the top.  The reporters were so bored while waiting for the big day, they resorted to interviewing each other at great length about absolutely nothing and there were a fair number of curmudgeonly comments like  “What’s the big deal” and “It’s only a baby.”  But it is a big deal, at least for us and the millions of others who embrace and celebrate a historic event when it happens.  

Raising a glass to toast the new arrival

Raising a glass to toast the new arrival

For our family, it completed a trifecta of fabulous events in London.  We moved to London in time to watch the British celebrate a spectacular Olympic summer. We enjoyed endless Jubilee celebrations and now we’re lucky enough to enjoy the revelry surrounding the birth of a future King of England.  Yes, we went to the Palace to raise a glass and celebrate the happy event.  Congratulations, Will and Kate.  And blessings on your new little one.  Long live the future King of England.

Royal Baby Announcement

Royal Baby Announcement

Advertisements

Following Anne Boleyn

I’m no expert on Anne Boleyn.  I’m more of an Anne Boleyn sympathizer.  I glean information about Anne from multiple questionable sources, ie  The Horrible History series I read to my kids, the epic and very racy television series,The Tudors and a song about Henry’s wives my kids learned in primary school. I can’t really remember how it goes…

Hever Castle

Lucky for me, my passionate retelling of the Horrible History books and a quick recap of The Tudors was enough to convince everyone to come with me to Hever Castle in Kent, the childhood home of Anne Boleyn.

Anne_Henry

Anne Boleyn (2nd wife of Henry VIII) spent her childhood at Hever Castle before attending Court in the Netherlands and France. Her ambitious father, Thomas Bullen (Boleyn) pushed Ann into King Henry VIII’s Court when Henry tired of having Anne’s sister, Mary, as a mistress. Anne was in love with Sir Percy, however, and was heartbroken when her match to Percy was denied. Anne left Court and returned to Hever Castle to nurse her broken heart where Henry VIII, enamored with Anne’s charm, wit and intelligence, visited her there often. She rebuffed his romantic advances and refused to become his mistress, which clearly motivated Henry to redouble his efforts to annul his marriage to Catherine.  Eventually, as we all know, Henry VIII broke ties with the Catholic Church and married Anne. He fathered one living child with Anne before he tired of her.  She was tried and convicted on a number of questionable charges and beheaded in May of 1536 to make way for Henry VIII”s third wife, Jane Seymour.

hever-castle

The house was eventually given to Henry’s fourth wife, Anne of Cleves, as compensation for the marital annulment after Henry decided Anne of Cleves was incredibly unattractive and refused to consummate the marriage.  Hever Castle passed through a number of families after Anne of Cleves’ death before falling into complete ruin, a sad state for a place that played a role in changing the course of English history.  John Jacob Astor, a wealthy American, purchased and restored the house and gardens n 1903.

It’s easy to imagine Anne wandering the grounds as a child or hiding from/with Henry in the hedgerows.  Supposedly, Anne’s ghost still wanders over the lovely wooden bridge and around the garden (without Henry) during Christmastime.

Photo via onthetudortrail.com

Photo via onthetudortrail.com

The house itself contains an extensive collection of artwork and antiques highlighting the Castle’s role in English history (no photos allowed, sadly).  I loved standing in Anne’s tiny bedroom, staring out the window and reading Anne’s prayer books, one of which she took to her execution. Love letters sent between Henry and Anne hang on the wall. They loved each other once-upon-a-time.

It seemed to me a bit insensitive to highlight Henry VIII so boldly throughout the property.  He did, after all, execute the woman who lived here.  Yet, his portraits and likenesses hang the Long Gallery and the Inner Hall and one of his gilded, personal locks hangs on the door of the Dining Room. Henry’s bedchamber has an original Tudor carved ceiling and a glorious, canopied bed.  If only walls could talk….

Le Temps Viendra   Anne Boleyn  "The Time Will Come"

Le Temps Viendra Anne Boleyn “The Time Will Come”

Things to Know

Hever Castle lies appx 35 miles from London, southeast of Edenbridge in West Kent. It was our first stop on a multi-day trip to the Southeast.  If you want to drive, consider taking the train/tube to the outskirts of London and picking up your car there. I didn’t follow my own advice, and it ended in a very long drive and  a few minor domestic disputes en route. If you’d rather go by train, check the link here to find out more.

Hever Castle is currently owned by a commercial venture, instead of a private family.  I was initially wary about having  a “faux” castle experience (you know what I mean) but was pleasantly surprised. The Castle was wonderfully presented.  The gardens are spectacular and the grounds have activities for children and grownups….archery, walking trails, camping (shudder) and mazes.  Beware the wet maze.  It’s called the WET maze for a reason.  The Mister was not amused.

The Castle opens later than the grounds, so time your visit accordingly. Check rates and times here  before you go. You can spend the night on the castle grounds by contacting the Hever Castle Bed and Breakfast.

If you have an interest in Anne Boleyn, you should also plan visits to Hampton Court Palace, the Tower of London and Blickling Hall.

If you have good reading recommendations about Anne, I’d love to hear them!    

The Tortoise and Hare Go Traveling

When our kids were little, really little, we traveled at a pretty slow pace.  If you’ve  traveled with a Little Person, you understand that everything takes longer than expected. You have to wrestle with car seats, nap time, bed time, hunger pangs, little legs and shorter attention spans.  Now that we occasionally travel without the kids, something is quite apparent.  The Mister and I suffer from TSI…Travel Style Incompatibility.

PicMonkey Collage

My  sweet husband is the Energizer Bunny of travel.  He is the only person I know who completed the entire British Museum collection in 90 minutes.  I am the Cecil Turtle of travel.  It takes me 90 minutes to work through one gallery at the V & A. We are officially the Tortoise and Hare of worldwide travel.

The Mister’s idea of a perfect day in a new city is 12 hours of sightseeing completed by lunch, which leaves enough time for 12 additional hours of sightseeing before dinner.  Twenty-four hours worth of activities squeezed into 8 hours.  With time for a walk before bed.  Rinse, lather, repeat.  My perfect day in a new city is a leisurely mix of wandering, sightseeing and multiple stops for food and photography.  His preferable breakfast is a banana in his backpack and a to-go coffee, mine involves a neighborhood cafe, endless cups of coffee and a lot of people-watching.   How do you plan happy travel for a box-checker and a “loose agenda, this-looks-cool-let’s-go-do-that-instead-after-a-coffee” person?

The Mister and Me

The Mister and Me

We’re trying to figure it out.  He is certainly wiser than he once was and knows it’s better to wake me up with a “Look!   I brought you coffee!” instead of  “Hey!  It’s already 7 o’clock! How much time do you need to get ready to go?”   I’ve learned not to plan sitting-on-the-beach vacations or endless afternoons poking through ancient, overgrown cemeteries.  It’s about compromise and learning from each other.  I think we can do that. How do you balance two different personalities while traveling?  Tell me your secrets!

Things to Know

*No feelings were harmed during the writing of this post.

Missing Pieces

Irish cottage

It was fitting. The driving Irish rain, the cold wind, the pervasive damp.  “Now you know why they left!” I said to my father as we headed away from Gort and into the countryside.  It wasn’t true (or maybe it was).  I drove back and forth along the narrow lane, stopping periodically to peer over a fence and take a picture.  “Could it be this one?  Maybe here?”

Screenshot Burke homestead

Screenshot Burke homestead

We were looking for what was left of my father’s people, or really…what was left of the Burke homestead. The people are long gone. I’ve been on this search before, in Gort, with a list of names and a vague outline of family history.  My sister had since filled in the blanks, researching rumor into fact and filling in missing lines on the family tree. Census forms and land records vaguely outlined the family property and I held a soggy Google Earth screenshot of an overgrown lot and a collapsed stone cottage.  The “homestead” was somewhere along the lane between the lake and the hedgerows.

rainy fields

It was surreal, standing in the middle of a field mentally trying to recreate a life you know nothing about, imagining what was so hopeless about a place you would walk away from everyone and everything you’ve ever known?  What finally drove the family to scatter, each in a different direction like seeds in a harsh wind?  The dates of emigration suggest they left during the Great Famine, which claimed the lives of many and the future of most.  Most headed to America, as did ours, but one family member was left behind.  Rumor has it he was “different” and was left behind to be cared for my neighbors.  There are stories about him, most too sad to think about. It’s hard to really know.

Burke Homestead (view from)

We took one last picture over the field-that-might-have-been-ours and headed back to the car.  A woman nodded hello over the fence. “Can I help you?”  We explained our story.  She nodded.  ” I wasn’t born here, but my husband…my husband would know. You can also try the old Missus up the road.  Her boys went to America.  She’ll know about the Burkes.”

We apologized for bothering her, climbed back into the car and contemplated finding the Missus Up The Road.  As we pulled onto the lane. we looked up to see the husband walking up the drive, waving. “I heard you were looking for your people.  The Burkes, is it?  Yes, we know about the Burkes.  They’re gone now, last one lived just down the lane across from the cottage.  They knocked the house down last year as it ’twas fallin’ in.  They live in America now, the Burkes.”

View from the lot, now cleared for building

View from the lot, now cleared for building

We chatted for a few minutes about the area, the weather and the neighbors before he headed down the drive to the house.  He paused, turned around and shouted ” God Bless ya…and welcome home.”

 

 

How I Wish I Spent My Summer Vacation

It’s inevitable.  Your children grow up and go off to do cool things without you.  As of today, I have one daughter working on a project in Haiti, another in India working with a start-up company and the Youngest One milking cows and making cheese in Switzerland.  The first two situations keep me awake at night, imagining every hideous scenario that might befall them.  The Switzerland project..well, I’m a little more comfortable with that, although I read that 481 people were injured by cows this year in the UK. Yes, I googled it.  I’m a worrier.

Afternoon hike near Bretaye

Afternoon hike near Bretaye

The Youngest One pitched her Switzerland WWOOFing idea right around Christmas break.  WWOOF-ing, an awkward acronym for World-Wide Opportunities On Organic Farms, pairs interested workers with willing farmers in a (hopefully) beneficial partnership. The wwoofer stays on local farm to learn the ins and outs of organic farming and the farmer gets an extra pair of hands to help with farm work.  Summer jobs are hard, if not impossible to find as a university kid on a Tier 2 visa and WWOOFing fit nicely with her Sustainable Development major at uni and her love of all things food.  One planned farm stay turned into 5 farm stays across the UK and Switzerland.

Farm #1  Shopshire, England, 1 Week

DSC_0281

DSC_0259

“Woofers” work 6 – 8 hours a day, 5 or 6 days a week.  In exchange, the host farm provides housing, meals and an opportunity to learn the basics of running a farm.  At this particular farm, responsibilities included building a 30 foot polytunnel and extending a fruit cage and feeding/caring for the chickens.

Walks along the country lane

Walks along the country lane

A world-class balloonist lands on the farm.

A world-class balloonist lands on the farm.

It isn’t all work, however.  Evenings/the occasional day off are spent socializing with other woofers and the family, exploring the surrounding areas and soaking up a new experience.

Farm #2  nr Bretaye, Switzerland, 2 Weeks

Goat face!

Goat face!

The second farm was spectacularly located in the Swiss Alps.  Paul and his wife, farm owners for over 30 years, started taking in wwoofers 7 years ago to help with the with goats, dairy cows and drives to morning market.  This “alpage” farm provided the full experience…milking goats, mending fences, making/flipping/selling cheese, rounding up and milking cows, chopping wood and washing farm equipment.  While wwoofers think about the travel/work/experience balance, host farmers worry about wwoofers that cancel at the last minute, don’t show up at all or prove unwilling to share the workload.  In the end, it’s about balance and a shared experience.  When it all works, it’s a beautiful thing…wwoofers contribute and learn about organic farming, farmers benefit from motivated and energetic learners and both parties have a mutually beneficial cross-cultural experience.

Making the cheese...

Making the cheese…

Moooving the cows up the mountain

Moooving the cows up the mountain

** Photo credits/Madeline Belt

Things To Know:

WWOOFing is an international phenomenon.  Each country or region has its own WWOOFing database and registration fee, which makes it a bit cumbersome when choosing a farm. It’s best to choose the region you’re interested in and send off for information and listings.

Farms and projects vary widely, so do your homework before choosing one.  Talk to other WWOOFers, email the farmers, ask questions.  This is NOT a vacation and you will work hard, but it is also a great way to travel inexpensively, meet the locals, try a foreign language and help others along the way.

There are bad woofing stories out there…farmers taking advantage of free labor, accommodations not suitable for human habitation and unsafe working conditions.  To avoid a bad woofing experience:  1. Set clear expectations about work hours, accommodations, meals, language requirements and time off.  Ask about the kind of work you’ll be doing. 2.  Have a Plan B and a stash of cash.  In our house, we call it “getaway” money.  In case you have to, you know, get away.  There are also good wwoofing stories. Do your homework. 

Wwoof Independents has a great FAQ about being/hosting guests through WWOOF.